Best Sledging Incidents – I

That immortal 'art' that has now been fine tuned by the Aussies has been around for as long as the game has been…Wiki refers to sledging as 'exchanging words with opposition player(s) which can put him(them) off their usual game; it is an attempt to "psych out" an opponent'. Cricket is a very interesting game, and sledging adds to it the extra spice that make it much more than just game.

Here is a compilation of the best sledging related incidents, witnessed in the history of cricket


Sledging has always been a part of cricket.
Even the great WG Grace did it.

Once in an exhibition match given out leg-before, he refused to walk and told the umpire: "They came to watch me bat, not you bowl". And the innings continued.
Grace's ability to stand his ground would have done Sunil Gavaskar proud. Once, when the ball knocked off a bail, he replaced it and told the umpire: "'Twas the wind which took thy bail orf, good sir." The umpire replied: "Indeed, doctor, and let us hope thy wind helps the good doctor on thy journey back to the pavilion."

The best WG Grace sledge was on him, though, not from him. Charles Kortright had dismissed him four or five times in a county game – only for the umpires to keep turning down his appeals. Finally, he uprooted two of Grace's three stumps. Grace stalled, as though waiting for a no-ball call or something, before reluctantly walking off with Kortright's words in his ears: "Surely you're not going, doctor? There's still one stump standing."

More to follow…

Disclaimer: This is not original content (not all of it, anyways) and has been taken from a mail forward. All copyrights rest with the original author(s)/compilors. Should any of them have objection to it, do let me know I will take this off. Let's not fight, ok!

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